Following the release last year of the report on ‘Sustainable Intensification in Agriculture’ by the Food Climate Research Network and the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food, around 30 experts in this field, from academic, governmental, NGO and industrial organisations, were asked to give their comments on the report.

They were asked two key questions:

  1. Where has the report helped resolve issues, and where it is misguided or simply wrong?
  2. How should we move forward, and what is required for sustainable intensification to become a concept useful for those charged with implementing policy?

These comments have all been compiled into a report which can be downloaded here:

Comments on Report

However, before reading them, we suggest you first read the original report.

Science will be publishing an article by the authors on sustainable intensification on July 5th 2013. If you are interested in reading it, please check back here then, or sign up to our newsletters (FCRN and Future of Food).

You can find out more about our work on Sustainable Intensification on our Sustainable Intensification webpage.

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By Mike Rayner, University of Oxford

Last Wednesday was a good day for those of us who have been campaigning for years for more understandable food labelling. The UK Government announced their final recommendation for front-of-pack nutrition labelling and who will be using it.

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Death rates from heart disease have more than halved in many European Union countries since the early 1980s, Oxford University researchers have found.

New research published in the European Heart Journal by members of the British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group at the University of Oxford.

Read the Oxford University Media coverage of this story.

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Our perception of how food tastes is influenced by cutlery, research suggests. Size, weight, shape and colour all have an effect on flavour, says a University of Oxford team.

The study in the journal Flavour suggests the brain makes judgements on food even before it goes in the mouth.

Read more about this research on the BBC news website

Read the journal article in Flavour

Listen to Charles Spence talking about this research on Radio 4's Material World

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New Report Identifies "Regret-Free" Approaches for Adapting Agriculture to Climate Change

Researchers provide clarity on action amid fears of wasted investments and imprecise science

A study called "Addressing uncertainty in adaptation planning for agriculture" has been published in PNAS by researchers from the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), including Oxford researcher, Joost Vervoort.

You can read the paper in PNAS here and you can read more about the research on the CCAFS website here.

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Science, Technology & Environmental Policy Program on the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Post-Doctoral Fellow or Associate Research Scholar for Global Agriculture and Climate Change

The Science, Technology, and Environmental Policy program at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University invites applications for a position as a post-doctoral research associate in Global Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Mitigation and Forest Protection.

This position will report to and work closely with Tim Searchinger, an Associate Research Scholar, and principal investigator of the project.

To apply, please visit the Princeton University website

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Job Title: James Martin Fellow

Project: Future of Food modelling project

Department: British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group (BHF HPRG), Dept of Public Health, Oxford

Grade 7: £29,541 - £36,298 p.a.

The closing date for applications is 12.00 midday on 12 July 2013 and it is planned to hold interviews on 23 July 2013.

Further details and information on how to apply please see the Oxford University Recruitment website

Further particulars: 108212 - James Martin Fellow G7 BHF

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Lord John Krebs has been interviewed by Jim al-Khalili on the Radio 4 programme The Life Scientific.

Lord Krebs talks about how he was first drawn to biology, his research as an animal behaviour specialist as Professor of Zoology at Oxford University, and his work in policy as the first Chairman of the Food Standards Agency, where he was embroiled in controversial questions such as is organic food better for us and how can the spread of foot and mouth disease be stopped.

Lord Krebs is now Master of Jesus College, Oxford, but is still involved in issues where science meets public policy, in particular the debate over whether culling badgers will prevent cattle contracting TB.

Lord Krebs is also, among other things, the Chair of the Advisory Group for the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food.

You can listen to the programme on the Radio 4 website

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Oxford Institute of Population Ageing & Department of Zoology, University of Oxford

Salary:   Grade 7 (£29,541 to £36,298)

The Oxford Institute of Population Ageing is seeking a quantitative researcher to work with Dr George Leeson in collaboration with Dr Mike Bonsall (Department of Zoology) on a project funded by the Oxford Martin Future of Food Programme.

Main responsibilities will be to conduct population modelling scenarios. As part of the scientific team at the Institute, the incumbent will be asked to contribute to research tasks related to demographic and statistical analysis. This is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the development of a world-leading research programme.

Applications should be submitted by 3 June 2013.

For more information and how to apply, please see the Job Details on the Oxford University Recruitment website

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Scientists at Lancaster, Virginia and Oxford universities have produced a web-based tool that allows anyone living in the UK to see their own ‘nitrogen footprint’. The tool, known as the N-Calculator, is available at:

http://www.n-print.org/sites/n-print.org/files/footprint_java/index.html#/home

Read more about the calculator on the N-Print website.

It asks users to put in information so the tool can calculate the likely effect that the food that they eat or the transport they take has on the environment in terms of nitrogen pollution. It is hoped that the tool will lead to more people choosing sustainable ways of living.

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