Job Title: James Martin Fellow

Project: Future of Food modelling project

Department: British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group (BHF HPRG), Dept of Public Health, Oxford

Grade 7: £29,541 - £36,298 p.a.

The closing date for applications is 12.00 midday on 12 July 2013 and it is planned to hold interviews on 23 July 2013.

Further details and information on how to apply please see the Oxford University Recruitment website

Further particulars: 108212 - James Martin Fellow G7 BHF


Lord John Krebs has been interviewed by Jim al-Khalili on the Radio 4 programme The Life Scientific.

Lord Krebs talks about how he was first drawn to biology, his research as an animal behaviour specialist as Professor of Zoology at Oxford University, and his work in policy as the first Chairman of the Food Standards Agency, where he was embroiled in controversial questions such as is organic food better for us and how can the spread of foot and mouth disease be stopped.

Lord Krebs is now Master of Jesus College, Oxford, but is still involved in issues where science meets public policy, in particular the debate over whether culling badgers will prevent cattle contracting TB.

Lord Krebs is also, among other things, the Chair of the Advisory Group for the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food.

You can listen to the programme on the Radio 4 website


Oxford Institute of Population Ageing & Department of Zoology, University of Oxford

Salary:   Grade 7 (£29,541 to £36,298)

The Oxford Institute of Population Ageing is seeking a quantitative researcher to work with Dr George Leeson in collaboration with Dr Mike Bonsall (Department of Zoology) on a project funded by the Oxford Martin Future of Food Programme.

Main responsibilities will be to conduct population modelling scenarios. As part of the scientific team at the Institute, the incumbent will be asked to contribute to research tasks related to demographic and statistical analysis. This is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the development of a world-leading research programme.

Applications should be submitted by 3 June 2013.

For more information and how to apply, please see the Job Details on the Oxford University Recruitment website


Scientists at Lancaster, Virginia and Oxford universities have produced a web-based tool that allows anyone living in the UK to see their own ‘nitrogen footprint’. The tool, known as the N-Calculator, is available at:

Read more about the calculator on the N-Print website.

It asks users to put in information so the tool can calculate the likely effect that the food that they eat or the transport they take has on the environment in terms of nitrogen pollution. It is hoped that the tool will lead to more people choosing sustainable ways of living.


Get Gobby

Are you a cash-strapped student? Enter our competition - Get Gobby - and you could win £500.

The Challenge: Tell us how you'd convince people to protect the environment by changing their diets.

Visit the Friends of the Earth website for more information.

Whatever your idea, make sure you send it in by midnight Sunday, June 9th 2013.


A report has just been released on the health impacts of a proposed 10% tax on sugary drinks in Ireland.

The working group who produced this report, commissioned by the Irish Minister for Health, had the expertise of Mike Rayner and his team from Oxford University who carried out modelling work on the financial tax implication for Ireland.

Conclusions based on evidence presented by the HIA process:

  • Obesity is multifaceted with many factors influencing the basic drivers of energy intake and energy expenditure including environment, socio-economic, psycho-social and genetic factors.
  • Sugar Sweetened Drinks (SSDs) are a source of energy intake with little or no other nutrient contribution to the diet.
  • Price increases tend to decrease demand by the degree to which this happens is variable because consumer behaviour and industry response to a tax is difficult to predict.
  • There is evidence linking Sugar Sweetened Drinks consumption with increases in energy intake.
  • The evidence linking Sugar Sweetened Drinks consumption with weight gain is suggestive but not conclusive.

The Working Group were broadly of the view that there was evidence to suggest that SSDs are associated with weight gain and that an SSD levy should not be seen as a revenue generating issue but rather a measure to change behaviour. They agreed that if this tax were implemented there would be a need for good monitoring and evaluation.

Read the entire report here


The Environmental Change Institute has launched a new policy briefing series: 'Insights for Policy'.

These four-page documents present the aspects of a particular piece of research relevant to policy makers in government, international organisations, business and charity sectors.

The first in the series is about food and environments in East Africa. It looks at how different futures might affect food security and environmental change in the region.

This research comes out of the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security (CCAFS).

Download the policy briefing here:
ECI Insights for Policy #1: Shared Action on Food and Environments in East Africa

Visit the Policy Briefing page on the ECI website here:
ECI Insights for Policy

Read more about CCAFS work on Scenarios:

Scenarios website

Scenarios blogs


What about food matters most to you?

The Oxford Food Governance Group wants to know!

Take our short (10-15 minute) survey and make your voice heard:

If you have any questions about this survey, please contact us at

Thank you!


Nutrient profiling and the regulation of marketing to children: Possibilities and pitfalls

Publication in the journal, Appetite, by Mike Rayner, Peter Scarborough and Asha Kaur, as part of a special issue on "Marketing to Children - Implications for Eating Behaviour and Obesity", with the UK Association for the Study of Obesity (ASO).#

To read the full article, please click here


The Thought for Food Challenge is an annual competition to catalyze university students from all fields of study to learn more about the complex challenges surrounding food security, and inspire them to channel their passions and creativity towards developing new ideas that make a difference.