• By 2050, reduced fruit and vegetable intake could cause twice as many deaths as under-nutrition
  • Three-quarters of all climate-related deaths due to changes in food production are estimated to occur in China and India

 

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By John Ingram, Food Systems Programme Leader, Environmental Change Institute, on the 'Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the U.S. Food System' report to which he contributed:

It is well recognised that climate change poses considerable risks to global food production: IPCC AR5 and many other analyses detail where, by how much and to what types of production system given degrees of climate change will have impact. There are, however, fewer analyses of the challenges facing the food system as a whole. While disruptions to production are clearly important, climate change – and extreme weather in particular – will impact many of the food system’s ‘post-farm gate’ activities and hence food security; food security depends on more than just food production. For instance, damage to food transport and storage infrastructure due to storms and floods causes local shortages, affecting food affordability and variety. Temperature and humidity changes can lead to numerous food safety issues, and hence both health considerations and food waste, the later also affecting availability. Consumer behaviour can also change, leading to changes in diets and hence nutrition.

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By Prof. Charles Spence

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A combination of a carbon tax on food and a tax on sugary drinks in the UK could lead to health benefits, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and raise up to GB£3.6 billion revenue, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Public Health.

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Article by Footprint:

 

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Conference Title: TECHNOLOGICAL FRONTIERS IN FOOD SECURITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

University of Oxford

May 7, 2016

Call for Papers

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Introduction by Marie Persson of the Food Climate Research Network (FCRN), Blog post by Henri de Ruiter

The UK is increasingly “outsourcing” the environmental impact of its food supply

This new FCRN blog-post discusses the findings of a recent paper by Henri de Ruiter and colleagues, Global cropland and greenhouse gas impacts of UK food supply are increasingly located overseas.  Henri is a PhD Student at the University of Aberdeen and the James Hutton Institute and his current PhD project considers the implications of meeting a healthy and environmentally sustainable diet for future land use. In this post he describes how the UK is becoming increasingly dependent on croplands overseas and the environmental implications of this trend. He also reflects on the complexities of this type of research, and describes the combination of methods that the researchers used to calculate the total cropland footprint of the UK and its associated greenhouse gas emissions.

 

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Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development,  New York University (2016-2017)

 

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‘On-farm’ seed priming: an ecological & sustainable disease management strategy

We are seeking a highly motivated individual to carry out PhD research in the field of agronomy, plant physiology, crop production and plant-microbe interactions. This studentship, funded by the Ekhaga foundation, will provide a platform to build an interdisciplinary research career in the field of Sustainable Agriculture & Agroecology.

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