Call for Contributions: World Food System Conference 2015 | 21 – 26 June 2015 | Ascona, Switzerland

Tackling World Food System Challenges: Across Disciplines, Sectors, and Scales

The World Food System Center of the ETH Zürich is pleased to announce that the call for contributions to the World Food System Conference 2015. The conference organizers are particularly interested in contributions that highlight cross- and trans-disciplinary collaborations and focus on solutions to the challenges facing the world food system.  Submission deadline is 22 February 2015.

Please see the flyer or visit www.wfsconference2015.org for further details.

Submission deadline: 22 February 2015

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By Kremlin Wickramasinghe, University of Oxford and Mike Rayner, University of Oxford

The Eatwell plate is the UK government’s official food guide about which foods we should eat to achieve a healthy diet. It is essentially a pie-chart depicting the recommended intakes of five specified food groups: fruit and vegetables, dairy products, cereals, meat and processed foods. It was first published 20 years ago – and despite some two decades of nutritional research has not been changed since.

In some countries – notably Australia, the US and Brazil – the official food guide is revised on a regular basis. Some two decades since it was first published, Public Health England has announced that it will revise the Eatwell plate in the light of proposed new recommendations on sugar from the government’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition.

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By Hannah Rowlands, Programme Coordinator

The theme of this year’s World Food Day is family farming, which brings together the importance of ensuring global food security and achieving sustainable development in the world’s poorest countries. But why are these such important issues? And why is it so difficult to find solutions that tick all the boxes?

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by Elisabeth van de Grift and Joost Vervoort

Decision-makers and researchers from across the East African Great Lakes region met in Entebbe, Uganda in late June to discuss what the future might hold in terms of development, agriculture and environmental change.

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By Abrar Chaudhury.

Local planning offers farmers a viable opportunity to adapt to uncertain climate change. A new working paper explores two ongoing Local Adaptation Plan of Action (LAPA) initiatives in Pakistan and Nepal, to highlight the potential of South-South learning.

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The Preventable Risk Integrated ModEl and Its Use to Estimate the Health Impact of Public Health Policy Scenarios

A new paper has been published this week by researchers in the British Heart Foundation Centre on Population Approaches to Non-Communicable Disease Prevention, Nuffield Department of Population Health.

This paper describes the PRIME (Preventable Risk Integrated ModEl) model, an openly available non-communicable disease (NCD) scenario model that estimates the effect of population-level changes in diet, physical activity, and alcohol and tobacco consumption on NCD mortality.

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What makes for the perfect dining experience? New book reveals how there is so much more to eating out than the food on our plates.

The Perfect Meal - The Multisensory Science of Food and Dining

By Charles Spence and Betina Piqueras-Fiszman

Published: 18th September 2014

What exactly makes the act of eating out so enjoyable? For some, it’s the flavour of the food, for others, the people they are sharing it with. The reality, however, is far more multisensory. Delivering great food means understanding how one sense affects another and knowing exactly how to bring each of those components together. Welcome to ‘gastrophysics’, a revolutionary new approach to the science of the perfect meal. Providing the latest insights from a diverse range of fields, including experimental psychology, design, neuroscience, sensory marketing, behavioural economics and the culinary and sensory sciences, Charles Spence and Betina Piqueras-Fiszman draw on expert opinion, delve into the latest research and make reservations at some of the world’s most cutting-edge restaurants in order to investigate of all of the elements that contribute to a diner’s enjoyment of a meal.

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By Dr John IngramFood Systems Programme Leader, Environmental Change Institute

The number of extreme weather events around the world appears to be increasing, and this is impacting on global food security. Here Dr. John Ingram of the Environmental Change Institute at Oxford University introduces new research and draws lessons from extreme weather events in Pakistan, Russia, the Philippines and East Africa since 2010.

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Extreme weather events leave populations with not enough food both in the short- and the long-term. A new report by the Environmental Change Institute (ECI), at the School of Geography and the Environment, concludes that better governance could have lessened the impact on the poorest and most vulnerable, and affected populations have been let down by the authorities in past disasters.

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By Abrar Chaudhury

A new journal paper by Oxford-based CCAFS researchers presents a participatory framework for costing agriculture adaptation interventions using varied assumptions of experts and local actors.

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