Public health

This blog post is taken from Research in Conversation, a series of interviews with researchers across Oxford University. Each interviewee raises a question arising from their research, which the next interview follows up on, approaching from a different discipline. Together, these linked interviews form 'chains' that collectively, and from many different perspectives, ask big questions like what it is to be human, how to live a healthy life and our changing relationship with information.

Read more...

On Tuesday 17 March, Professor Susan Jebb gave the annual Oxford London Lecture entitled: Knowledge, nudge and nanny: opportunities to improve the nation’s diet.

The entire talk is now available to watch online.

Read more...

By Kremlin Wickramasinghe, University of Oxford and Mike Rayner, University of Oxford

The Eatwell plate is the UK government’s official food guide about which foods we should eat to achieve a healthy diet. It is essentially a pie-chart depicting the recommended intakes of five specified food groups: fruit and vegetables, dairy products, cereals, meat and processed foods. It was first published 20 years ago – and despite some two decades of nutritional research has not been changed since.

In some countries – notably Australia, the US and Brazil – the official food guide is revised on a regular basis. Some two decades since it was first published, Public Health England has announced that it will revise the Eatwell plate in the light of proposed new recommendations on sugar from the government’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition.

Read more...

The Preventable Risk Integrated ModEl and Its Use to Estimate the Health Impact of Public Health Policy Scenarios

A new paper has been published this week by researchers in the British Heart Foundation Centre on Population Approaches to Non-Communicable Disease Prevention, Nuffield Department of Population Health.

This paper describes the PRIME (Preventable Risk Integrated ModEl) model, an openly available non-communicable disease (NCD) scenario model that estimates the effect of population-level changes in diet, physical activity, and alcohol and tobacco consumption on NCD mortality.

Read more...

Food and Behaviour Research presents a one-day conference on:

Sugar, Fat, Food and Addiction: New Approaches to the Public Health Crisis with Prof. Robert Lustig MD

Date: Thursday 10 July, 2014

Time: 9.30 am to 4.30 pm (registration from 9.00 am)

Venue: The Royal College of Surgeons, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A

FAB Research is extremely proud to offer this opportunity to hear from our highly distinguished panel of international researchers and expert practitioners, who will present and discuss potential new approaches to the growing public health crisis, focused on the latest evidence linking food and diet with behaviour.

Our central theme is the controversial issue of whether some nutrients, foods or dietary patterns may actually promote (or reduce) ‘addictive’ behaviours. Sugar has recently come under the spotlight in this respect, although the scientific evidence in this area, and its implications, still remain hotly debated.

Related topics under discussion will include obesity and other eating disorders, alcoholism and other substance use disorders, antisocial behaviour, and other mental health conditions in which impulsivity and poor self-control play a key role, such as ADHD. 

Presentations and discussions will be focused on both the latest scientific evidence and its broader implications for  policymakers, professionals, food industry representatives and the general public.

For more information, and to book your place, please visit the FAB Research website.

Read more...

By Kremlin Wickramasinghe

This week, the British Heart Foundation Centre on Population Approaches for Non-Communicable Disease (NCD) Prevention in the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford was officially designated as the WHO Collaborating Centre on Population Approaches for NCD Prevention.

Read more...

The Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food Lecture 2013 is now available to listen to on our website.

The lecture was given by Professor Susan Jebb was entitled "Food, Health And The Environment: Towards A More Sustainable Diet".

Read more...

By Hannah Rowlands.

We were honoured to have Professor Susan Jebb present our first annual lecture on November 27, 2013.

Professor Susan Jebb is a nutrition scientist, but recognises that dietary advice for consumers needs to optimise health within the constraints of a sustainable food supply.

Read more...

Are lower carbon diets healthier? Adam Briggs explains new research to model the effects of taxing greenhouse gas-intensive foods.

Read more...

People » Adam Briggs

NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow in Public Health, British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group (BHFHPRG)

Adam is a Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellow studying for a DPhil jointly supervised by the BHF CPNP and the Health Economics Research Centre (HERC), he is also an honorary Specialty Registrar in Public Health at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. His DPhil aims to model the cost-effectiveness of different public health policies affecting diet and physical activity.

Read more...

Pages