Oxford SciBar: Should we all become vegans to save the world?

Date: Wednesday 19th November

Time: 6.30pm

Venue: Port Mahon, St Clements St

What lifestyle changes are you willing to try in order to reduce your carbon footprint? Walking or cycling to work? Taking less long haul flights? How about going vegan? A new study suggests that greenhouse gas emissions associated with vegan diets are about half that of a meat-based diet, and the difference in a year amounts to an individual flying from London to New York and back. Join us to hear Dr Peter Scarborough discuss the role of meat in sustainability and dietary health and find out whether cutting back on meat could make you and the planet more healthy.

SciBar is a relaxed informal event.

Find out more about Oxford SciBar on their website.


A study into the greenhouse gas emissions caused by different types of diet has for the first time provided quantitative evidence that going meat-free can dramatically reduce environmental impact. The paper, published in the journal Climatic Change, analysed data from the diets of 65,000 meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans, and found the greenhouse gas emissions for a meat-based diet were approximately twice as high as those for vegans, and about 50 per cent higher than for vegetarians.

One of the authors of the paper, Dr Peter Scarborough, spoke to the Oxford Martin School's Communications Officer, Sally Stewart, about the research and its implications.