Climate change

Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture and the transport of food make up a significant proportion of global emissions, while climate change will impact food systems through increased drought, flooding and extreme weather events.

Speaker: Professor Michael Hamm, Michigan State University

Title: Regional food systems for improved resilience

Date: Monday 23 February

Time: 4.15pm

Location: Gottman Room, OUCE

The talk will be 30-45 minutes, followed by a Q&A session and then a short wine reception.

Everyone welcome.

We in the developed world have tended to concentrate our food sources in areas with a ‘comparative advantage’ for production, typically for climatic reasons.  The cost of energy, post-harvest handling technology, and varietal development has made this possible.  We have entered a period where increased extreme weather events and climatic shifts make this a more risky venture – and provide a strong rationale for regionalized food systems to increase resilience of our food system and help insure food security. This seminar will use examples from the United States and East Africa to illustrate the notion and rationale.

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Professor Joshua Farley, Vermont University

4-8 March 2013

Professor Joshua Farley from Vermont University will be giving a series of lectures, seminars and workshops in Week 8:

Monday 4 March, 4:00-6:00pm, SoGE Auditorium
Lecture: "The Political Economy of Ecosystem Services"

Tuesday 5 March, 2:00-5:00 pm, Beckit Room, SoGE
Hands-on case study based workshop for Masters students: "From Small Family Farms in Brazil’s Atlantic Forest to Global Food and
Ecosystems: How do we Value, Produce and Allocate Essential and Nonsubstitutable resources on a full planet?"
(pre-registration requested, e-mail Thomas.Thornton@ouce.ox.ac.uk)

Wednesday 6 March, 2:00-4:00 pm, Seminar Room B, St Cross Building (Department of Economics)
"Monetary and Fiscal Policy for a Steady State Economy"

Thursday 7 March, 2:15-4:00 pm, ISCA, 61 Banbury Rd
"Does Excessive Quantification Diminish the Social Sciences? The Case of Economics"

Friday 8 March, 2:00-3:30 pm, Seminar Room B, qeh-ODID
Open discussion on the contribution of ecological economics to development studies with ODID researchers and Visiting Professor Pascal van Griethuysen from The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland.

Download a programme for this visiting lecturership

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The Oxford Food Security Forum Lunchtime Talks Hilary Term 2013 on Global Food Security, organised by the student-led Oxford Food Security Forum

Speaker: Prof. Barbara Harriss-White, School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, University of Oxford

Title: “Climate Change and Rice in India”

Venue: Queen Elizabeth House, Meeting Room A, 3 Mansfield Road

Date: Week 1, Monday 14 January 2013

Time: 12.30pm - 1.30pm

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The Oxford Food Security Forum Lunchtime Talks Hilary Term 2013 on Global Food Security, organised by the student-led Oxford Food Security Forum

Speaker: Peter Scarborough, DPhil, British Heart Foundation Health Promotion Research Group, University of Oxford

Title: “Diet, Environmental Sustainability and Chronic Disease”

Venue: Queen Elizabeth House, Meeting Room A, 3 Mansfield Road

Date: Week 4, Monday 4 February 2013

Time: 12.30pm - 1.30pm

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The Oxford Food Security Forum Lunchtime Talks Hilary Term 2013 on Global Food Security, organised by the student-led Oxford Food Security Forum

Speaker: John Ingram, Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Food Security Leader, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

Title: “Food Security and Environmental Change: A Two-­Way Street”

Venue: Queen Elizabeth House, Meeting Room A, 3 Mansfield Road

Date: Week 5, Monday 11 February 2013

Time: 12.30pm - 1.30pm

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Diet, Health and the Environment: Towards a More Sustainable Diet

Time & Date: 4pm, Wednesday 27 November

Venue: Lecture Theatre A, Department of Zoology, South Parks Road

Speaker: Professor Susan Jebb, Professor of Diet and Population Health, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences

Professor Susan Jebb will speak about the relationship between diet, health and the environment, and how we might encourage changes in behaviour towards a more sustainable diet.

Book Launch for "Food: A Very Short Introduction"

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception and a book launch for Professor Lord Krebs's new book entitled, "Food: A Very Short Introduction".

In this Very Short Introduction, Prof Lord John Krebs provides a brief history of human food, from our remote ancestors 3 million years ago to the present day. By looking at the four great transitions in human food - cooking, agriculture, processing, and preservation - he considers a variety of questions, including why people like some kinds of foods and not others; how your senses contribute to flavour; the role of genetics in our likes and dislikes; and the differences in learning and culture around the world.

In turn he considers aspects of diet, nutrition, and health, and the disparity between malnutrition in some places and overconsumption in others. Finally, he considers some of the big issues - the obesity crisis, sustainable agriculture, the role of new technologies such as genetic modification of crops, and ends by posing the question: how will it be possible to feed a population of 9 billion in 2050, without destroying our natural environment?

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Oxford SciBar: Should we all become vegans to save the world?

Date: Wednesday 19th November

Time: 6.30pm

Venue: Port Mahon, St Clements St

What lifestyle changes are you willing to try in order to reduce your carbon footprint? Walking or cycling to work? Taking less long haul flights? How about going vegan? A new study suggests that greenhouse gas emissions associated with vegan diets are about half that of a meat-based diet, and the difference in a year amounts to an individual flying from London to New York and back. Join us to hear Dr Peter Scarborough discuss the role of meat in sustainability and dietary health and find out whether cutting back on meat could make you and the planet more healthy.

SciBar is a relaxed informal event.

Find out more about Oxford SciBar on their website.

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Date: 28-30 June 2015

Venue: Balliol College, University of Oxford

The Oxford Water and Membranes biannual research events gather scientists and engineers to share ideas and progress in addressing some of the key challenges of the 21st century.

This year’s theme ‘The Water, Food and Energy Nexus’ will encompass any aspect of the water-food-energy nexus, whether it be one of the components separately or their interactions.

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Speaker: Professor Sir John Beddington

Time: 5pm - 6.30pm

Date: Thursday 26 February

Some five years ago Sir John Beddington, Senior Adviser at the Oxford Martin School, raised the concept of 'The Perfect Storm' in which the issues of food, water and energy security needed to be addressed at the same time as mitigating and adapting to climate change. In this seminar he highlights changes that have occurred since then and the progress made and challenges that are currently faced.

Join in on Twitter #2015climate

This seminar will be live webcast on YouTube

Please Register to attend here.

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Taking place at SSEE, University of Oxford, Hayes House, 75 George Street, Oxford, OX1 2BQ.

Speaker: Tim Searchinger (SSEE and OMS Visiting Fellow and Associate Research Scholar at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School)

Seminar Summary: What role is growing demand for food, bioenergy and forest products playing and likely to play in deforestation and other losses of terrestrial carbon?   What role do and can yield gains and pasture intensification play in protecting forests?  Many analysts treat such gains automatically as sparing natural lands while other researchers claim that they often lead to increasing deforestation?  Should Africa’s wetter savannas be viewed as a large, environmentally low cost land reserve?  How do we know underutilized land when we see it?  Answers to these questions are often confused by various conventions and misapplications of land use and carbon accounting and by the failure to appreciate the interlinkages of land use changes worldwide. This talk will address these challenges.

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