Development

Elements of the food system have strong linkages with issues of development, since developing economies are often largely agricultural, and the poorest people disproportionately suffer from hunger and chronic food insecurity.

By Cory Rodgers

On May 4th, the Oxford Food Security Forum hosted its third annual conference at St. Antony’s College, featuring three panels organised around the theme “Critical Perspectives and Marginalised Issues.”

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By Christopher Adam and Doug Gollin, Department of International Development

A new issue of the Oxford Review of Economic Policy discusses the economics and politics of the rapidly changing global food and agricultural system. 

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By Chase Sova.

Emerging economies often look to the United States as a model for how to grow their agricultural sectors. Doing so when climate impacts strike, however, may yield more questions than answers.

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By Cecilia Schubert, Communications Officer and Joost Vervoort, CCAFS Scenarios Officer

Scenarios work makes headway as it now informs climate, agriculture and socio-economic development policies across seven countries.

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By Cecilia Schubert, Communications Officer (CCAFS) with significant contributions from Marieke Veeger and Joost Vervoort, both working for the Future Scenarios team.

Future scenario development and modeling approach helps further strengthen Honduras’ risk management and climate adaptation strategy.

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This blog post is by Chase Sova, DPhil student at the Environmental Change Institute, and is a summary of the talk given by Peter Hazell recently

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By Chase Sova.

Twenty years ago, negotiators from around the world came together in the Uruguay Round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). The goal: to identify global principles for agricultural exchange. Export subsidies in the late ‘80s from industrialized economies like the United States resulted in the dumping of cheap agricultural products in developing countries, undermining local producers. These and other trends fueled efforts to correct growing inequalities in an increasingly globalized food system. Yet given food security’s central role in national security and an evolving belief in food security as a fundamental human right, an agreement on agriculture was slow to be reached.

Today, the world has come together again, and while the conversation has shifted toward the urgent need to tackle climate change, the same agricultural challenges remain.  Nearly 1 billion people across the world are food insecure or undernourished; populations continue to grow in sub-Saharan African (SSA) and South Asia; and food systems face severe impacts from a world that, on its current trajectory, is likely to be four degrees warmer than present averages.  At the Lima climate negotiations, however, the collective answer to the ‘agricultural question’ was, yet again, to avoid it altogether.

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Notes from Food Security Conference

By Hannah Rowlands.

April 27th was the 2nd Annual Oxford Student Food Security Conference. Around 70 people attended this 1-day conference, with presentations from 9 researchers, covering a wide range of issues on the topic of food security, plus animated discussions after each session. The day ended with an interesting and entertaining keynote talk by Professor Doug Gollin.

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by Elisabeth van de Grift and Joost Vervoort

Decision-makers and researchers from across the East African Great Lakes region met in Entebbe, Uganda in late June to discuss what the future might hold in terms of development, agriculture and environmental change.

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By Jessica Thorn, Biodiversity Institute in the Department of Zoology, University of Oxford

With the closing of COP19 in Warsaw last month, some may be disappointed that negotiating parties put a hard stop around negotiating adaptation to climate change  for agriculture and land use. Rather than reaching concrete political commitments now, debates remain around what should be done for policy and science in the future. Considering the complex difficulties in bridging gaps between what is and what should be, it is not surprising that the burden will be continue fall on 2.5 billion people depending on subsistence agriculture. This only highlights the utility of considering the future for action now.

Jessica Thorn, of the Systemic Integrated Adaptation program of CCAFS (Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security) reports on an impact evaluation study that was conducted in Nepal in recent months. Her research assesses the impact of adaptations to land management of smallholders on ecosystem processes, goods, and services. And many of the themes that arise hone in on cooperation, collaboration, and knowledge sharing to develop more sustainable solutions.

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