Governance

Food security in a globally-connected world will require better governance at all levels – local, national and international.

Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development,  New York University (2016-2017)

 

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A restatement of the natural science evidence base relevant to the control of bovine tuberculosis in Great Britain

This paper, aiming to provide a succinct summary of the natural science evidence base underlying bovine tuberculosis policy in the UK, has been published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The evidence summary can be found as the Appendix to a paper published (August 7th 2013) in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, Biological Sciences with an annotated bibliography as supplementary material online. The open access article can be accessed here and a version as a single pdf can be downloaded here.

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Dr Tara Garnett, who runs the Food Climate Research Network, has just brought out a paper in the Journal of Cleaner Production which looks at 3 perspectives on sustainable food security: efficiency, demand restraint, food system transformation. She then asks: what is the role of Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) within these perspectives?

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Our researchers' reactions to George Obsorne's inclusion of a sugar tax in the latest governmental budget:

Professor Susan Jebb:

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An international panel of scientists is calling for an evidence-driven debate over whether a widely used type of insecticide is to blame for declines in bees and other insect pollinators.

The Oxford Martin School published on May 21st the second in its "restatement" series. Restatements take an area of current policy concern and controversy and attempt to set out the science evidence base in as policy neutral way as possible. They also provide a commentary on the nature of the evidence base.

The restatement, from a group of nine scientists led by Professor Charles Godfray and Professor Angela McLean from the Oxford Martin School, attempts to clarify the scientific evidence available on neonicotinoids to enable different stakeholders to develop coherent policy and practice recommendations. 

The study is published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society.  It is open access and can be downloaded from the Royal Society website here or you can download a single pdf of the paper with the Annotated Bibliography.

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A report has been published which maps out environment-related risks in the agricultural supply chain and shows how they might affect assets over time.

The report is written by Ben Caldecott, Nicholas Howarth and Patrick McSharry from the Smith School of Enterprise and the Envionment's Stranded Assets Programme.

Download the report from the Stranded Assets Programme website here.

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Last week Oxford Food Governance Group team member Dr. Catherine Dolan commented on the growing interest of Business Schools and MBA students in sustainable food entrepreneurship in the Financial Times.

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The balancing act of producing more food sustainably

A policy known as sustainable intensification could help meet the challenges of increasing demands for food from a growing global population, argues a team of scientists in an article in the journal Science.

To read the article in Science without a journal subscription, please click through the links on the FCRN website.

The goal of sustainable intensification is to increase food production from existing farmland says the article in the journal’s Policy Forum by lead authors Dr Tara Garnett and Professor Charles Godfray from the University of Oxford. They say this would minimise the pressure on the environment in a world in which land, water, and energy are in short supply, highlighting that the environment is often overexploited and used unsustainably.

The authors, university researchers and policy-makers from NGOs and the UN, outline a new, more sophisticated account of how ‘sustainable intensification’ should work. They recognise that this policy has attracted criticism in some quarters as being either too narrowly focused on food production or as representing a contradiction in terms.

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