Health & Food Safety

There are many diseases and infections that people get through the food they eat, and food safety, particularly but not exclusively in less-developed countries, is a major challenge.
 

Livestock, Environment and People (LEAP)

Call for job applicants

May 2017

Supported by the Wellcome Trust Our Planet Our Health Programme.

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Scientists in the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics have discovered a previously unknown mechanism behind how the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene promotes obesity.  Their findings may have important implications for future therapeutic strategies to combat obesity.

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A consortium brought together by the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food has received a major award from the Wellcome Trust as part of their 'Our Planet, Our Health' programme.

The project will look at the consequences of the global increase in the consumption of meat, dairy and other animal-sourced foods and how it affects the environment and human health.  It will focus on how to achieve changes towards more sustainable and healthy diets.

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A review on Meat consumption, health, and the environment was published in Science on the 20th July by the Livestock, Environment and People (LEAP) team, highlighting the growing annual consumption of meat and its consequences. The review states that changing meat consumption habits is a challenge that requires identifying the complex social factors associated with meat eating and developing policies for effective interventions.

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Obesity in school-age children may be having a significant effect on the health of their hearts, an Oxford University study suggests.

The researchers show that obese children and adolescents have several risk factors for heart disease – including raised blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and a thickening of the heart muscle – compared with normal weight children.

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A global switch to diets that rely less on meat and more on fruit and vegetables could save up to 8 million lives by 2050, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by two thirds, and lead to healthcare-related savings and avoided climate damages of $1.5 trillion (US).

 

The study, published today in PNAS, is the first to estimate both the health and climate change impacts of moving towards more plant-based diets for all major world regions.

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Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development,  New York University (2016-2017)

 

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A global shift towards healthy and more plant-based diets, halving food loss and waste, and improving farming practices and technologies are required to feed 10 billion people sustainably by 2050, a new study finds. Adopting these options reduces the risk of crossing global environmental limits related to climate change, the use of agricultural land, the extraction of freshwater resources, and the pollution of ecosystems through overapplication of fertilizers, according to the researchers.

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On 2nd March 2017 the BBC World Service and Wellcome Collection hosted a panel discussion exploring whether vegetarianism is a sustainable option globally. The event was recorded in front of a live audience and will be broadcast on the World Service in April.

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