Nutrition

Good health requires a good diet, and diseases of under-nutrition and over-nutrition (e.g. heart disease and diabetes) are some of the major challenges in modern medicine.

On Tuesday 17 March, Professor Susan Jebb gave the annual Oxford London Lecture entitled: Knowledge, nudge and nanny: opportunities to improve the nation’s diet.

The entire talk is now available to watch online.

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If you missed the Oxford Martin School event last week, "Well fed? The health and environmental implications of our food choices", with talks by Professor Susan Jebb, Dr Mike Rayner and Dr Tara Garnett, then you can watch a video of the event here:

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A study co-authored by Oxford researchers says spikes in food prices during the last global recession can be linked with the increase in malnutrition among children in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh in 2009.

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Narratives of food insecurity tend to pass over unconventional foods as invisible to local sustenance. Perhaps it's the gross-factor to Western perspective, but we're ignoring an important component to what could be a more localized approach to sustainable food systems. See how one documentary series from the World Food Programme normalizes various food sources.

 

 

 

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By Colin Mitchell, University of Oxford and Mike Rayner, University of Oxford

An EU decision to allow health claims to be made about fructose has angered obesity experts who blame the fruit sugar for rising obesity levels in the US. The decision allows food and drink manufacturers to claim the “consumption of foods containing fructose leads to a lower blood glucose rise compared to foods containing sucrose or glucose”, where at least 30% of other sugars have been replaced by fructose.

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By Mike Rayner, University of Oxford

Last Wednesday was a good day for those of us who have been campaigning for years for more understandable food labelling. The UK Government announced their final recommendation for front-of-pack nutrition labelling and who will be using it.

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By Hannah Rowlands.

We were honoured to have Professor Susan Jebb present our first annual lecture on November 27, 2013.

Professor Susan Jebb is a nutrition scientist, but recognises that dietary advice for consumers needs to optimise health within the constraints of a sustainable food supply.

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Are lower carbon diets healthier? Adam Briggs explains new research to model the effects of taxing greenhouse gas-intensive foods.

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By Kremlin Wickramasinghe, University of Oxford and Mike Rayner, University of Oxford

The Eatwell plate is the UK government’s official food guide about which foods we should eat to achieve a healthy diet. It is essentially a pie-chart depicting the recommended intakes of five specified food groups: fruit and vegetables, dairy products, cereals, meat and processed foods. It was first published 20 years ago – and despite some two decades of nutritional research has not been changed since.

In some countries – notably Australia, the US and Brazil – the official food guide is revised on a regular basis. Some two decades since it was first published, Public Health England has announced that it will revise the Eatwell plate in the light of proposed new recommendations on sugar from the government’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition.

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